Sad Cone

I don’t remember if we were driving or running the first time Alex called my attention to him, lying on his side in a muddy puddle. We couldn’t figure out what his purpose was there. There was no logic to his being placed by the side of a running path in the center of a collection of rainwater where it was unlikely anyone would step, whether he was there or not.

“You know what I feel sad for?” Alex asked, pausing before gesturing to the side of the road and answering himself. “Sad Cone.”

Photo of a bright orange cone lying on its side in a puddle of water.And it was. It was so sad. There he was, lying face down in the muck and the freezing cold and the rain. And no one cared about Sad Cone.

Except Alex and me. We cared about Sad Cone.

Sad Cone lived in a puddle by the side of Alex and my running route. We would also regularly drive by Sad Cone. We always made note of him as we passed, checking to see how deep his puddle was or whether his mud coat had climbed higher. Sad Cone became a character in our lives.

During our runs, I told Alex about running mantras and how sometimes internally repeating such a mantra can keep a runner moving when they think they can’t go on. One day, during a particularly difficult stretch, Alex said, “I AM NOT SAD CONE!” and thus was born a running mantra.

(He also sometimes uses, “OUTTA MY WAY, JERKASS!” complete with flailing arms and shoving, but I prefer the Sad Cone mantra.)

We kept Sad Cone company all fall and he gave us a smile every time we ran passed him. We noted when his puddle seemed particularly cold or dirty. We commented when tire tracks appeared around him. His mantra pushed Alex to run when it was hard. We were contemplating bringing a Sharpie on a run so we could give Sad Cone a face and share him with the other runners on our path.

Then, just as Sad Cone’s puddle shallowed and started to ice over so that we could start thinking about reaching him, we drove past one day and noticed that someone had saved him. He was still on his side, but he was on dry pavement on the other side of the road. By the time we went running the next day, Sad Cone was gone entirely.

We didn’t even get to say goodbye.

We’ve been running a few times since Sad Cone left and it’s just not the same. We’ll never know who put him in that puddle or why and we don’t know who took him away. Sad Cone is gone, but we will always remember him.

9 thoughts on “Sad Cone

  1. i refuse to admit that i’ve been thinking about this for like a week, but i’m going to say that his puddle was once ice, and the ice looked thick, but wasn’t strong enough to bear the weight of, let’s say a runner who might have been tempted to glide across it (in either an attempt to save time, or, more likely, on impulse, because .. whee!) and therefore, sad cone (who was not sad at all), sat atop the ice warning passersby with his echo-ey “nothing to see here, folks, no whee to be found.” until one day the ice melted, and cone keeled over into the water which was once his base, his work now done. so he wasn’t really sad, just resting after completing his work and now he is off guarding another patch of ice. look closely, kids, you might see him again someday.

  2. .i refuse to admit that i’ve been thinking about this for like a week, but i’m going to say that his puddle was once ice, and the ice looked thick, but wasn’t strong enough to bear the weight of, let’s say a runner who might have been tempted to glide across it (in either an attempt to save time, or, more likely, on impulse, because .. whee!) and therefore, sad cone (who was not sad at all), sat atop the ice warning passersby with his echo-ey “nothing to see here, folks, no whee to be found.” until one day the ice melted, and cone keeled over into the water which was once his base, his work now done. so he wasn’t really sad, just resting after completing his work and now he is off guarding another patch of ice. look closely, kids, you might see him again someday.

  3. I’ve been photographing cones since I read this post–perhaps I should dust off my blog and post a bit about frozen cone and baby cone. Thanks for getting me to pay attention to a rather delightful way to view a parking lot.

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